power food: classic hummus

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My seven-year-old son was psyched about this hummus, which I served with raw cauliflower, and he kept saying, “This is so addicting, isn’t it?”

The truth is, we’ve kind of been addicted to cauliflower these days, going through about two heads of it a week. For a family who rarely consumes as much food as one grown male (not counting sugar cereal), that’s saying something, especially considering it’s a vegetable.

power foods: roasted asparagus

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For me, asparagus is synonymous with spring, and more specifically, Easter. It’s one of those vegetables I really didn’t discover until I was in my twenties, and then wondered where I had been the last two decades. I love it, and even more so when it’s roasted.

power food friday: roasted beet and butternut toss

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I didn’t forget about Power Food Fridays, I just, well, haven’t posted one in awhile . . . I think it’s been over a year. Maybe two.

Okay, so I’m not the most consistent person you’ll ever meet. But I’m trying to turn that around.

Anyway, onto business . . .

Beets are a serious power food. I mean, look at their color! Usually, the more colorful a fruit or vegetable is, the higher in nutrients it is.

They boast beta-carotene, folate, Vitamin C, iron, and fiber. Don’t you just feel good about yourself when you eat them? I love them in just about anyway that you can serve them: roasted, juiced, canned, pickled, sliced, and in cake. Yeah, I pretty much love beets. They might even be my favorite vegetable. What do you think about beets? Are you a lover or a hater? What about your kids?

mediterranean salsa

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Have you seen the latest November issue of Martha Stewart Living yet? I’m quoted in the Kashi ad for their Original 7 Grain Sea Salt Pita Crisps. Here is what I said about them, along with a little recipe for that mediterranean salsa:

Eating healthy always tends to present a challenge for me, especially as a food blogger. When I write a post on something naughty . . . let’s say, for example, those maple bacon pecan bars, I have a tendency to opt for the naughty food over regular meals. There’s a crazy part of my brain that thinks that since I made the maple bacon pecan bars, then I am somehow entitled to every . . . last . . . one. And furthermore, why would I make a salad or throw together a quinoa dish when something is already in the fridge—right there, ready to be eaten? It’s all very dangerous.